Russians want Bolshevik leader Lenin to be buried

Though his communist movement might have collapsed in the reincarnated present-day Russia, Lenin's body remains embalmed in a tomb next to the walls of Moscow's landmark Kremlin since his death in 1924.

But now, in a poll conducted by a Russian website, 48 per cent of the respondents voted that the body of the former Bolshevik leader should be buried, Ria-Novosti reported.

Those polled wanted the body to be removed from the mausoleum on Moscow's Red Square and buried at a cemetery, while only 26 per cent of those polled were against it, the survey said. Rest were undecided.

The come four days after the newly-appointed Culture Minister, Vladimir Medinsky, suggested burying Lenin's body and turning the Moscow mausoleum into a museum.

Speaking to Ekho Moskvy radio, Medinsky said it was "absurd" that the Bolshevik revolutionary's embalmed body was still on public display next to the Kremlin walls.

The debate about what to do with Lenin's body has been rocking Russia since the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. Last year, the administration of then-President Dmitry Medvedev said the decision whether to remove Lenin's body rested with the nation's "political leadership."

Ever since the Soviet Union began to break apart there have been repeated attempts to put the founding father of Russian communism six feet under. But no political leader has yet dared to take the step many Russians regard as sacrilege.

  

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Business Standard

Russians want Bolshevik leader Lenin to be buried

Press Trust of India  |  Moscow 



Though his communist movement might have collapsed in the reincarnated present-day Russia, Lenin's body remains embalmed in a tomb next to the walls of Moscow's landmark Kremlin since his death in 1924.

But now, in a poll conducted by a Russian website, 48 per cent of the respondents voted that the body of the former Bolshevik leader should be buried, Ria-Novosti reported.

Those polled wanted the body to be removed from the mausoleum on Moscow's Red Square and buried at a cemetery, while only 26 per cent of those polled were against it, the survey said. Rest were undecided.

The come four days after the newly-appointed Culture Minister, Vladimir Medinsky, suggested burying Lenin's body and turning the Moscow mausoleum into a museum.

Speaking to Ekho Moskvy radio, Medinsky said it was "absurd" that the Bolshevik revolutionary's embalmed body was still on public display next to the Kremlin walls.

The debate about what to do with Lenin's body has been rocking Russia since the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. Last year, the administration of then-President Dmitry Medvedev said the decision whether to remove Lenin's body rested with the nation's "political leadership."

Ever since the Soviet Union began to break apart there have been repeated attempts to put the founding father of Russian communism six feet under. But no political leader has yet dared to take the step many Russians regard as sacrilege.

  

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Russians want Bolshevik leader Lenin to be buried

Eighty eight years after his death, nearly half the Russians want the late Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin, who led the first communist revolution, to be buried.

Though his communist movement might have collapsed in the reincarnated present-day Russia, Lenin's body remains embalmed in a tomb next to the walls of Moscow's landmark Kremlin since his death in 1924.

But now, in a poll conducted by a Russian website, 48 per cent of the respondents voted that the body of the former Bolshevik leader should be buried, Ria-Novosti reported.

Those polled wanted the body to be removed from the mausoleum on Moscow's Red Square and buried at a cemetery, while only 26 per cent of those polled were against it, the survey said. Rest were undecided.

The come four days after the newly-appointed Culture Minister, Vladimir Medinsky, suggested burying Lenin's body and turning the Moscow mausoleum into a museum.

Speaking to Ekho Moskvy radio, Medinsky said it was "absurd" that the Bolshevik revolutionary's embalmed body was still on public display next to the Kremlin walls.

The debate about what to do with Lenin's body has been rocking Russia since the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. Last year, the administration of then-President Dmitry Medvedev said the decision whether to remove Lenin's body rested with the nation's "political leadership."

Ever since the Soviet Union began to break apart there have been repeated attempts to put the founding father of Russian communism six feet under. But no political leader has yet dared to take the step many Russians regard as sacrilege.

  
image
Business Standard
177 22

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