You are here: Home » International » News » Others
Business Standard

No country caps on Green Cards: US House passes bill; India to benefit

Indian IT professionals are worst sufferers of current immigration system which imposes a 7% per country quota on allotment of Green Card

Topics
green card | Indian IT firms | H1B Visa

Press Trust of India  |  Washington 

US may stop spouses of H1B visa holders from working

The US lawmakers Wednesday passed a bill aimed at lifting the present seven per cent country-cap on issuing Green Cards, a move which would benefit thousands of highly-skilled Indian IT professionals.

A allows a person to live and work permanently in the US.

Passed by the US House of Representatives, the bill, on being signed into law, would considerably shorten the agonising wait of talented professionals from countries like India who have applied for permanent residency in the United States.

Indian IT professionals, most of whom are highly skilled and come to the US mainly on the H-1B work visas, are the worst sufferers of the current immigration system which imposes a seven per cent per country quota on allotment of the coveted Green Cards or permanent legal residency.

Lifting the per-country cap would mainly benefit professionals from countries like India, for whom the wait for is more than a decade.

Some of the recent studies have said the waiting period for Indian IT professionals on H-1B visas is more than 70 years.

No more than seven per cent of the visas may be issued to natives of any one independent country in a fiscal year, according to the US Citizenship and Immigration Services.

According to the Congressional Research Service (CRS), this bill increases the per-country cap on family-based immigrant visas from seven per cent of the total number of such visas available that year to 15 per cent and eliminates the seven per cent cap for employment-based immigrant visas.

It also removes an offset that reduced the number of visas for individuals from China.

The bill, however, has to be passed by the Senate, wherein the Republicans enjoy a majority, before it can be signed into law by President Donald Trump.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Thu, July 11 2019. 05:55 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
.