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Kia Motors recalling 295,000 vehicles due to risk of engine fires

Kia is recalling nearly 295,000 vehicles in the US because the engines can stall or catch fire

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Kia Motors | Automobile | automobile industry

AP  |  Detroit 

Kia Sonet
Kia Sonet

Kia is recalling nearly 295,000 vehicles in the US because the engines can stall or catch fire.

The recall comes just a week after Kia and affiliated Korean automaker Hyundai were fined by the US government for allegedly delaying recalls.

The recall covers certain 2012 and 2013 Sorento SUVs, 2012 through 2015 Forte and Forte Koup cars, and 2011 through 2013 Optima Hybrid cars.

Also included are 2014 and 2015 Soul SUVs and 2012 Sportage SUVs.

Kia says in documents posted Saturday by the US government that no manufacturing defect has been found, but it's recalling the vehicles to mitigate any risk of fire.

The recall comes after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began investigating Kia and Hyundai engine fires in 2019.

The agency opened the probe after the nonprofit Center for Auto Safety filed a petition seeking the investigation.

When the inquiry began, the agency said it had owner complaints of more than 3,100 fires, 103 injuries and one death.

Kia will notify owners starting January 27.

Dealers will inspect the engines for fuel or oil leaks and replace them if necessary.

The company also is developing a knock sensor software update.

Last week, the NHTSA announced that Kia and Hyundai must pay USD 137 million in fines and for safety improvements because they moved too slowly to recall more than 1 million vehicles with engines that can fail.

The fines resolve a three-year government probe into the companies' behavior involving recalls of multiple models dating to the 2011 model year.

Kia must pay USD 27 million and invest USD 16 million on safety performance measures. Another USD 27 million payment will be deferred as long as Kia meets safety conditions, the NHTSA said.

Kia denied the US allegations but said it wanted to avoid a protracted legal fight.

Engine failure and fire problems with Hyundais and Kias have plagued the companies for more than five years.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Sat, December 05 2020. 21:11 IST