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Brazil Senate report urges charging Jair Bolsonaro over pandemic

A Brazilian senator has formally presented a report recommending President Jair Bolsonaro be indicted on criminal charges for allegedly bungling Brazil's response to the Covid-19 pandemic

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Jair Bolsonaro | Brazil

AP  |  Brasilia 

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro speaks with journalists as he arrives at Alvorada Palace, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro

A Brazilian senator has formally presented a report recommending President be indicted on criminal charges for allegedly bungling Brazil's response to the COVID-19 pandemic and pushing the country's death toll to second-highest in the world.

The report by Senator Renan Calheiros is based on six months of work by the committee investigating the government's management of the pandemic and was made available on the Senate's electronic system Wednesday. It calls for Bolsonaro to be indicted on a series of charges, from charlatanism and inciting crime all the way up to crime against humanity.

The report, which is based on six months of work by the committee, calls for Bolsonaro to be indicted on nine charges, from charlatanism and inciting crime all the way up to crime against humanity, according to two members of the committee that has been investigating the government's handling of the pandemic.

The report can still be modified before the committee vote on October 26, and the decision on whether to file most of the charges would be up to Brazil's prosecutor-general, who was appointed by the president.

Analysts say it's unclear if he would act.

Recommended charges also include misuse of public funds and prevarication, which entails delaying or refraining from action required as part of a public official's duty for reasons of personal interest.

Bolsonaro has denied any wrongdoing, and has repeatedly accused the investigation of being a political instrument aimed at sabotaging him.

Critics have denounced Bolsonaro for downplaying COVID-19's severity, ignoring health guidelines on masks and restrictions on activity designed to prevent the virus' spread, touting unproven treatments and delaying the acquisition of vaccines.

Anger over the president's response prompted creation of the Senate committee in April, which has investigated allegations that Bolsonaro's management of the pandemic caused many of Brazil's more than 600,000 deaths from the disease.

Even during the worst throes of the pandemic, Bolsonaro steadfastly restrictions on activity, claiming the poor would suffer worse hardship if the economy ground to a halt. He continues to argue that the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine is effective in treating COVID-19, though broad, major studies have found it to be ineffective and potentially dangerous.

During six months of investigation, senators obtained thousands of documents and heard testimony from over 60 people.

This committee collected evidence that abundantly demonstrated that the federal government was silent and chose to act in a non-technical and reckless manner," according to an earlier draft of the report, which was reviewed by The Associated Press on Tuesday.

The draft had recommended the president be indicted for homicide and genocide, as well, though those two were scrapped in the face of opposition from committee members and concern that bombastic claims could undermine the report's credibility.

The draft concluded that the government deliberately exposed the population to a concrete risk of mass infection, influenced by a group of unofficial advisers who advocated for pursuing herd immunity long after many experts said that wasn't a viable option.

In addition to Bolsonaro, the final report will recommend charges for dozens of allies, current and former members of his administration and his three eldest sons, all of whom are politicians, according to the two senators who spoke with the AP.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Wed, October 20 2021. 20:06 IST
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