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G-20 suspends poor nations' debt payments for 6 additional months

The Group of 20 nations, representing the world's biggest economies, say they have agreed to extend the suspension of debt payments by an additional six months to support the most vulnerable countries

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G-20

AP  |  Washington 

Markets, Coronavirus

The Group of 20 nations, representing the world's biggest economies, say they have agreed to extend the suspension of debt payments by an additional six months to support the most vulnerable countries in their fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

sThe announcement was made on Twitter during a meeting of the group's finance ministers and central bank governors. The suspension of more than $14 billion in debt payments had been due to expire at the end of the year.

Wednesday's decision gives developing nations until the end of June 2021 to focus spending on health are and emergency stimulus programs rather than debt repayments.

The virtual discussions are being held at the start of this week's meetings of the 189-nation Monetary Fund and the World Bank, which are also being conducted virtually because of the coronavirus pandemic.

We still need to do more," Mohammed al-Jadaan, the finance minister for Saudi Arabia, this year's chair of the G-20, said at a news conference after the meeting. "We must ensure these nations are fully supported to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. ... We have agreed to extend the debt suspension initiative by six months.

Al-Jadaan said there will be further discussions at April's spring meetings to decide whether the suspension should be extended for an additional six months. He stressed that the pandemic has threatened the fiscal stability of many countries, particularly the poorest.

Al-Jadaan said that another finance ministers' meeting will be held virtually next month, before the leaders' summit on Nov. 21-22. He said the goal will be to agree on a framework that goes beyond even the current debt suspension initiative. He did not elaborate.

Transparency International, Amnesty and a collective of groups called CIVICUS had written to the finance ministers ahead of their meeting to warn that the world is facing a crisis unlike any in the last century and that debt suspension is only a first step.

The groups said that many of the poorest countries are still spending more on debt payments than on life-saving public services. They urged the nations to cancel existing debt until at least through 2021.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Wed, October 14 2020. 23:07 IST
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