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Medicine most sought after career for girls in tier I cities

Press Trust of India  |  Mumbai 

Female students in tier I cities prefer to take up medicine as a profession, while those in tier II mostly opt for banking, according to a survey.

In a survey conducted by education portal careerguide.Com recently, response from 6,000 female students in the age group of 18-25 living in tier I, II and III cities and belonging to diverse background, were taken up.

As many as 16 per cent of girls in tier I cities said they will opt for medicine as a profession.

"From the survey, it is evident that medical is the most sought after profession for girls in tier I cities, followed by banking and engineering. Law and entrepreneurship are the least sought after careers in tier I cities for girls," Founder and CEO of careerguide.Com, Surabhi Dewra said.

Dewra said in tier II cities, banking is the primary sector chosen, followed by engineering and teaching.

"Sixteen per cent of girls surveyed opted for a career in banking in tier II cities. In tier III cities, teaching emerged as the most popular career choice with 19 per cent share," she said.

In tier III cities, 44 per cent of girls opted for higher education after graduation, while only 22 per cent preferred doing jobs, the survey report said.

A fair share of 44 per cent of girls in tier I cities opted for jobs after graduation while 21 per cent preferred to go for higher education after getting Bachelors degree.

In tier II cities, 35 per cent pursued further education after graduation while 34 per cent opted for job.

The study also revealed that a total of 29 per cent of respondents in tier I cities opted for higher education and jobs for self support, while the number in tier II and III cities stood at 25 per cent and 20 per cent, respectively.

Gaining self confidence emerged as another reason for girls to pursue jobs and higher education after graduation.

A total of 27 per cent girls in tier III cities said they go for jobs and higher education to avert marriage proposals.

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First Published: Wed, September 23 2015. 13:07 IST
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