You are here: Home » Current Affairs » News » National
Business Standard

States should stop blaming each other on stubble burning: Kejriwal

Arvind Kejriwal said state governments should stop blaming each other and work together to find a solution to the issue of stubble burning, one of the major causes of Delhi's yearly issue of poor air

Topics
Arvind Kejriwal | Stubble burning | Delhi

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal during an interaction with traders in New Delhi.
Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal

Chief Minister on Tuesday said state governments should stop blaming each other and work together to find a solution to the issue of stubble burning, one of the major reasons for the yearly problem of poor air in Delhi-NCR during winters.

Kejriwal said while farmers of neighbouring states and people of are bearing the brunt of stubble burning, governments have shut their eyes.

State governments should stop blaming each other. We have to work together to find a solution to the issue All agencies and governments need to take it seriously now, he told reporters in Hiranki village in Narela where the spraying of Pusa bio-decomposer solution started on Tuesday.

The solution, experts say, can turn the stubble into manure in 15 to 20 days and therefore, can prevent

I am worried about farm fires in neighbouring states. The smoke has started affecting Delhi's air qualityAir pollution was under control for the last 10 months, but it has started increasing again, the chief minister said.

Imagine the impact of on the families of farmers who have no option but to burn the crop residue. Farmers don't burn it willfully, he said.

While the farmers of neighbouring states and the people of are bearing the brunt of stubble burning, governments have shut their eyes. I hope that they take concrete steps so that the entire north India gets rid of high levels of air pollution, he said.

The Pusa bio-decomposer is being sprayed free of cost in around 800 hectares of land in where non-basmati rice is grown.

Thenational capital's air quality hit the very poor category on Tuesday morning, the first time since February, with calm winds and low temperatures allowing accumulation of pollutants.

According to the Ministry of Earth Sciences'Air Quality Early Warning System for Delhi, an increase in farm fires in Punjab, Haryana and neighbouring regions of Pakistan is also going to impact the air quality in Delhi-NCR.

The city recorded an air quality index (AQI) of 303 at 8:30 am, which falls in the very poor category.

An AQI between 0 and 50 is considered 'good', 51 and 100 'satisfactory', 101 and 200 'moderate', 201 and 300 'poor', 301 and 400 'very poor', and 401 and 500 'severe'.

NASA's satellite imagery showed a large cluster of fires near Amritsar and Firozpur in Punjab and Patiala, Ambala and Kaithal in Haryana.

According to the System of Air Quality and Weather Forecasting and Research, farm fires contributed 3 percent particulate matter to Delhi's PM2.5 concentration on Monday.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Tue, October 13 2020. 14:14 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
.